Tricontahedral Solitudinarian

The name doesn't really mean anything

Every Anime I Can Remember Reviewed! Update II

Posted by Doug on February 4, 2010

Continuing (very slowly) with my ongoing project to review every anime I can remember enough about to have an opinion on (all previous reviews can be found here), for today I have Bubblegum Crisis Tokyo 2040, Coyote Ragtime Show, The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, and Cowboy Bebop after the fold.

B (★★★——)

Bubblegum Crisis Tokyo 2040

Synopsis: In a futuristic world where robots go out of control, a group of four women called the Knight Sabers don high-powered battle suits and defend against the robots and the super-corporation that is responsible.  Review: This series ostensibly takes place in the same universe as A.D. Police, with a lot of the same premise and background, but BGC 2040 is orders of magnitude better.

A (★★★★—)

Coyote Ragtime Show

Synopsis: In seven days, the Galactic Federation is going to completely annihilate the war-torn Planet Graceland, where the Pirate King Bruce hid the ten billion dollars he stole from the Central Bank in a custom vault.  Notorious space pirate Mister, once one of Pirate King Bruce’s best friends, teams up with Bruce’s daughter to try and recover the money from Graceland, all the while being pursued by the Galactic Police and a dozen goth-loli android hitwomen.  Review: Coyote Ragtime Show is ridiculous and over-the-top, and I like it that way.  It’s in the same vein as the Pirates of the Caribbean movies, except it’s anime and sci-fi and has android goth-loli hitwomen.  And it’s 193.4±27.9% more awesome.

The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

Synopsis: Kyon is through with believing in aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Haruhi is searching for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Despite Kyon’s protests, together they form a club to search for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Unbeknownst to Haruhi, but beknownst to Kyon, is the fact that the three other students Haruhi recruits into the club are an alien, a time traveler, and an esper…and they all think Haruhi has the subconscious power to alter reality… Review: The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya series is one of the best science fiction series I’ve come across, animated or not.  Everything about this series is top-notch, and the only thing keeping this series from a place among the Grade S anime is the infamous “Endless Eight” episodes from the second season.  Essentially, the premise of the “Endless Eight” is that the characters are trapped repeating the same couple weeks over and over again, a la Groundhog Day.  Multi-episode arcs are common in the Haruhi Suzumiya series, and the concept would have worked well spread out over two or maybe three episodes, tops, but for some unfathomable reason, they decided to cycle through the exact same sequence of events for eight episodes. Eight freaking episodes.

The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

Synopsis: Kyon is through with believing in aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Haruhi is searching for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Despite Kyon’s protests, together they form a club to search for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Unbeknownst to Haruhi, but beknownst to Kyon, is the fact that the three other students Haruhi recruits into the club are an alien, a time traveler, and an esper…and they all think Haruhi has the subconscious power to alter reality… Review: The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya series is one of the best science fiction series I’ve come across, animated or not.  Everything about this series is top-notch, and the only thing keeping this series from a place among the Grade S anime is the infamous “Endless Eight” episodes from the second season.  Essentially, the premise of the “Endless Eight” is that the characters are trapped repeating the same couple weeks over and over again, a la Groundhog Day.  Multi-episode arcs are common in the Haruhi Suzumiya series, and the concept would have worked well spread out over two or maybe three episodes, tops, but for some unfathomable reason, they decided to cycle through the exact same sequence of events for eight episodes. Eight freaking episodes.

The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

Synopsis: Kyon is through with believing in aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Haruhi is searching for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Despite Kyon’s protests, together they form a club to search for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Unbeknownst to Haruhi, but beknownst to Kyon, is the fact that the three other students Haruhi recruits into the club are an alien, a time traveler, and an esper…and they all think Haruhi has the subconscious power to alter reality… Review: The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya series is one of the best science fiction series I’ve come across, animated or not.  Everything about this series is top-notch, and the only thing keeping this series from a place among the Grade S anime is the infamous “Endless Eight” episodes from the second season.  Essentially, the premise of the “Endless Eight” is that the characters are trapped repeating the same couple weeks over and over again, a la Groundhog Day.  Multi-episode arcs are common in the Haruhi Suzumiya series, and the concept would have worked well spread out over two or maybe three episodes, tops, but for some unfathomable reason, they decided to cycle through the exact same sequence of events for eight episodes. Eight freaking episodes.

The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

Synopsis: Kyon is through with believing in aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Haruhi is searching for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Despite Kyon’s protests, together they form a club to search for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Unbeknownst to Haruhi, but beknownst to Kyon, is the fact that the three other students Haruhi recruits into the club are an alien, a time traveler, and an esper…and they all think Haruhi has the subconscious power to alter reality… Review: The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya series is one of the best science fiction series I’ve come across, animated or not.  Everything about this series is top-notch, and the only thing keeping this series from a place among the Grade S anime is the infamous “Endless Eight” episodes from the second season.  Essentially, the premise of the “Endless Eight” is that the characters are trapped repeating the same couple weeks over and over again, a la Groundhog Day.  Multi-episode arcs are common in the Haruhi Suzumiya series, and the concept would have worked well spread out over two or maybe three episodes, tops, but for some unfathomable reason, they decided to cycle through the exact same sequence of events for eight episodes. Eight freaking episodes.

The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

Synopsis: Kyon is through with believing in aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Haruhi is searching for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Despite Kyon’s protests, together they form a club to search for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Unbeknownst to Haruhi, but beknownst to Kyon, is the fact that the three other students Haruhi recruits into the club are an alien, a time traveler, and an esper…and they all think Haruhi has the subconscious power to alter reality… Review: The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya series is one of the best science fiction series I’ve come across, animated or not.  Everything about this series is top-notch, and the only thing keeping this series from a place among the Grade S anime is the infamous “Endless Eight” episodes from the second season.  Essentially, the premise of the “Endless Eight” is that the characters are trapped repeating the same couple weeks over and over again, a la Groundhog Day.  Multi-episode arcs are common in the Haruhi Suzumiya series, and the concept would have worked well spread out over two or maybe three episodes, tops, but for some unfathomable reason, they decided to cycle through the exact same sequence of events for eight episodes. Eight freaking episodes.

The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

Synopsis: Kyon is through with believing in aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Haruhi is searching for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Despite Kyon’s protests, together they form a club to search for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Unbeknownst to Haruhi, but beknownst to Kyon, is the fact that the three other students Haruhi recruits into the club are an alien, a time traveler, and an esper…and they all think Haruhi has the subconscious power to alter reality… Review: The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya series is one of the best science fiction series I’ve come across, animated or not.  Everything about this series is top-notch, and the only thing keeping this series from a place among the Grade S anime is the infamous “Endless Eight” episodes from the second season.  Essentially, the premise of the “Endless Eight” is that the characters are trapped repeating the same couple weeks over and over again, a la Groundhog Day.  Multi-episode arcs are common in the Haruhi Suzumiya series, and the concept would have worked well spread out over two or maybe three episodes, tops, but for some unfathomable reason, they decided to cycle through the exact same sequence of events for eight episodes. Eight freaking episodes.

The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

Synopsis: Kyon is through with believing in aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Haruhi is searching for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Despite Kyon’s protests, together they form a club to search for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Unbeknownst to Haruhi, but beknownst to Kyon, is the fact that the three other students Haruhi recruits into the club are an alien, a time traveler, and an esper…and they all think Haruhi has the subconscious power to alter reality… Review: The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya series is one of the best science fiction series I’ve come across, animated or not.  Everything about this series is top-notch, and the only thing keeping this series from a place among the Grade S anime is the infamous “Endless Eight” episodes from the second season.  Essentially, the premise of the “Endless Eight” is that the characters are trapped repeating the same couple weeks over and over again, a la Groundhog Day.  Multi-episode arcs are common in the Haruhi Suzumiya series, and the concept would have worked well spread out over two or maybe three episodes, tops, but for some unfathomable reason, they decided to cycle through the exact same sequence of events for eight episodes. Eight freaking episodes.

The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

Synopsis: Kyon is through with believing in aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Haruhi is searching for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Despite Kyon’s protests, together they form a club to search for aliens, time travelers, and espers.  Unbeknownst to Haruhi, but beknownst to Kyon, is the fact that the three other students Haruhi recruits into the club are an alien, a time traveler, and an esper…and they all think Haruhi has the subconscious power to alter reality… Review: The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya series is one of the best science fiction series I’ve come across, animated or not.  Everything about this series is top-notch, and the only thing keeping this series from a place among the Grade S anime is the infamous “Endless Eight” episodes from the second season.  Essentially, the premise of the “Endless Eight” is that the characters are trapped repeating the same couple weeks over and over again, a la Groundhog Day.  Multi-episode arcs are common in the Haruhi Suzumiya series, and the concept would have worked well spread out over two or maybe three episodes, tops, but for some unfathomable reason, they decided to cycle through the exact same sequence of events for eight episodes. Eight freaking OH GAWD STOP THIS BULLSHIT RIGHT NOW! Setting that one bit of ridiculousness aside, the series stands out as being just so different from anything else.  A movie based on the Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya light novel is due out sometime this year; if the official trailer is any indication, it might be awesome enough to erase the memories of the “Endless Eight”.

S (★★★★★)

Cowboy Bebop, Cowboy Bebop: The Movie

“Well, that’s a real shame.  But we’re not cops, and we’re not from some charity organization.  Sorry, lady, but we don’t protect or serve.  This is strictly business.”

Cowboy Bebop

Synopsis: Spike’s a former Syndicate mafioso.  Jet’s a former Intra-Solar System Police officer.  Faye’s a con artist who spend a few decades in suspended animation.  Ed’s a hacker extraordinaire…and she’s a girl.  Ein is a Pembroke Welsh corgi.  They are bounty hunters, tracking down anyone with a price on their heads in pursuit of enough money to keep from starving to death.  Awesomeness ensues.

Review: The anime series starts off pretty good, but things don’t start getting awesome until Faye is introduced in episode 3 (“Honky Tonk Women”), and only emerges as truly epic after Ed rounds out the crew starting in episode 9 (“Jamming with Edward”).  The interplay of these characters is half the charm of the show; the other half is the action.  Spike is a complete badass: he knows jeet kune do, he’s an amazing shot with his Jericho 941 handgun, and his dogfighting skill in his spaceship Swordfish II is second to none.  And he is such a smartass about it all.  It’s great.  Each of the characters has at least one episode devoted to exploring their backstory; needless to say, Spike’s history with the Red Dragons Syndicate is just so damn badass it defies words.  A lot of the fans of Cowboy Bebop that I know IRL didn’t like the movie, most often citing that it was just “an extra-long anime episode”, but if you ask me, it is among the best parts of the series (really, the series is awesome; an extra-long episode that stays true to the TV series is concentrated awesome in a can).  All in all, Cowboy Bebop is a classic and should be considered required viewing.

Notes: They’re doing a live-action Cowboy Bebop?  This concerns me; anime-to-live action conversions rarely go well.  And Keanu Reeves is going to play Spike?   Keanu Reeves? This is so wrong.  I don’t think Keanu Reeves can pull off the cavalier attitude needed for Spike, not in the least.  He may be a good actor, but his range doesn’t even approach Spike’s character.  That, and he’s almost two decades too old…  Well, at least they’ve got Shinichiro Watanabe (Cowboy Bebop‘s director, not to be confused with Excel Saga’s Shinichi Watanabe) on the project as an associate producer, so there is a little glimmer of hope.  But so help me if they get anyone other than Yoko Kanno to do the soundtrack, I’ll…well, I don’t know what I’ll do, but it won’t be pretty.


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